Tag Archives: Sacha Black

Link Bank November 2016: A recap of NaNoWriMo

Welp, November is officially over, and with it National Novel Writing Month. Whether you participated this year or not, it’s a time to focus on your writing overall and see what you can accomplish and what needs to improve. Over the past month, I’ve written lots of writing advice here, but I wanted to record some of the best advice from around the internet for future reference.

5 tips to win NaNoWriMo (and survive life, creatively) – The Tempest

“But I’ve met a lot of people who finish and never go further, even if they say they want to. People whose eyes go glassy when I tell them that going well above 50,000 words a month is my normal routine, regardless of what month it is. But there’s nothing special about me! I was not given a magic potion to drink! I have no fairy godmother! I just want to jump off the cliff and into the void.”

*I am an editor at “The Tempest.”

Advice from authors for your NaNoWriMo success – Unbound Worlds

“Don’t try to create and destroy at the same time. Either you are ‘creating’ draft – and your inner critic is turned totally OFF, anything goes, you just write without judgement, or you are ‘editing’ – destroying – this is a separate stage, it happens after you have a draft and after you know your idea – you are reshaping that draft and refining your words to convey that idea with more clarity. Then you have your inner critic turned on, and you cut what’s garbage. ”

How to fall in love with your writing – Nerds of Color

“Early in my writing career, I made the mistake of forsaking fun and enjoyment while writing. I wasn’t invested in the short stories I wrote. Don’t get me wrong, they were well structured and well-written, but… the stories lacked my enthusiasm/passion/soul (or what have you).”

NaNoWriMo – The dirty truth – Sacha Black

“Writers block, unblocked, blocked again, Shovel more chocolate in to cure depressive writers mentality. Self criticise. Stupid NaNo. Suddenly remember why you started the challenge, tap tap tap, chocolate, crisps, hate on work for getting in the way of writing, tap tap. Feel the burn, feel the slump, can’t do it any more, for the love of god why did I start this… Stupid idea.”

Link Bank: July 2016

This month it’s all about the craft at the Link Bank, with advice on writing and film-making from the experts:

The Visual Writer’s Guide to Pacing and Tension – Sacha Black

“Once you’re knee-deep wading through the slush of your story, you know as well as I do, you can’t see the commas for the sentences. Let alone step back enough to see the shape of your newly trimmed bush manuscript.”

The Secret to Sequels is in the Details – Film School Rejects

“For a lot of sequels, adding characters audiences will latch onto should be a no-brainer for the studios. Often it’s a way to give kids a new toy to buy, and that’s surely Disney’s original thinking behind both Hank and BB-8, but to sell those toys the characters have to leave a mark on viewers, and that benefits audiences not concerned with such merchandise because great characters are still great characters.”

5 Tips To Finish Your First Draft – Writers in the Storm

“Even with the looming due date and clear path, I still have those days where I stare at the screen digging for the right phrase, clueless how to take a scene from point A to point B. I wander through the words—a babe lost in the woods. It sucks. But it’s not my first rodeo (truly, I’ve been to a real rodeo in Wyoming) and I’ve learned a few tricks of the trade.”

50 Blog Topics for Fiction Writers – Mixtus Media

“Blogs are a great way to think outside of the box, challenge yourself as a writer and, as an added bonus, engage and grow your audience.”

How To Write A Screenplay – The Write Practice

“In college, I took a class with John Wilder, a veteran film and TV writer, who began the class by writing, “STRUCTURE! STRUCTURE! STRUCTURE!” on the chalkboard in big bold letters. “What’s the most important part of a screenplay?” he would ask at the beginning of nearly every class. It was obvious what he thought: Structure.”

Looking for even more advice? Check out How To Write Everything by David Quantick, Stephen King’s memoir On Writing, and more How-Tos at the bookstore.